31 Days of Halloween Hysteria: “Dream Home”

The body count isn't an exaggeration...
The body count isn’t an exaggeration…

Buying a house can be murder.

We’ve all been there, even before the global financial meltdown made the idea of owning your home something akin to science fiction for many people.  In Pang Ho-Cheung’s satirical horror movie, “Dream Home”, Cheng Lai-Sheung (Josie Ho) endures hardships and horrors which would dissuade most people from pursuing their dream of owning an upscale apartment with a view of Hong Kong’s harbour.

Cheng works two jobs and cares for an ailing father, having saved relentlessly since her youth to afford a flat which would give her family a better standard of living.   She has a loveless affair with a wealthy married guy and has friends who are so resigned to renting rather than buying in one of the world’s most populous and expensive cities that they’d sooner blow their cash on lavish trips to Tokyo than save for a deposit.

Our anti-heroine’s tale of property-induced madness is told in a non-linear style, with the present of 2007 juxtaposed with episodes from Cheng’s youth which show us roughly how she came to be the hammer-wielding, single-minded one-woman harbinger of death we see on screen.

And here we get to one of the issues with the movie – and it’s a biggie.  Whilst the privations and suffering which Cheng undergoes are numerous, they still seem out of proportion to the level of bludgeoning violence she metes out to the inhabitants of the apartment building she visits.  One killing – of a pregnant woman – is so particularly vile that it unbalances the film and could be a deal-breaker for some viewers.  You might say that it was for me, as it became impossible to sympathise with Cheng after this point.

Nonetheless, I watched the whole film and found “Dream Home” a confused movie.  The tone ramps between syrupy, sepia-coloured memoir, acid-tongued economic satire and bloody slasher black comedy without ever sticking the landing.  We get one particularly gruesome bloodbath in a hipster flat where a character has their intestines abruptly removed and sits enjoying a calming cigarette as friends and a pair of hookers are messily dispatched.

I get the sense that this film was swinging for the kind of horrific intensity and jet-black humour of “American Psycho”, blending commentary on the banal cruelties of climbing the career and social ladder with the over the top carnage of a prime 1980’s slasher flick (albeit with a Final Girl who’s also the murderous villain).  That’s all very well, but the literal blood & guts on display seem to override everything, becoming the focus.  And our leading character Cheng feels like a sketch, rather than a fully-realised protagonist.

I can’t say that I enjoyed “Dream Home” at all.  Gore in place of plot, a cast of mostly detestable knife fodder and satirical underpinnings which seem like an afterthought – none of these factors add up to a compelling film for me. The final moments of the movie, which seem to offer a comeuppance for our anti-heroine, come rather too late and seem like an attempt to provide a rap across the knuckles for somebody who deserves somewhat more punishment for her crimes.